“Modern” Superman Means “Spider-Man”

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Warner Bros. officially released Superman’s plot details, and they align with what Vulture reported last October.  Before we get to that, first we must point out that writer David Goyer claims that Christopher Nolan figured out how to adapt Superman to the modern times.  That “modern” story is Clark Kent “trying to decide if he should, in fact, even become Superman.”  That’s not modern: that’s Spider-Man.

As next year’s redundant Spider-Man reboot The Amazing Spider-Man will illuminate, Peter Parker was a teenager who acquired superhero powers, used them to his advantage, and only decided to use them to help people when his Uncle Ben was murdered and he kills the murderer.  Hell, the whole crux of the character is the line: “with great power there must also come great responsibility.”

Granted, Superman first appeared in the 1930s and Spider-Man first appeared in the 1960s, but when it comes to  “modern” films (to use the producers’ words), Spider-Man set the precedent.  As Jon Favreau argued the limitations of adapting comic books to movies, viewers don’t follow the back-and-forth time and storylines that readers do.  Therefore, with Superman’s later release date, it won’t be viewed so much as a modern story as a rip-off.

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  1. […] Contested That “modern” story is Clark Kent “trying to decide if he should, in fact, even become Superman.” That’s not modern: that’s Spider-Man. […]



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